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Titular Absence

Here are some things I typed.
Apr 5 '14

jessethorn:

To be honest, I don’t even know what the premise of this sketch from last week’s SNL is. But I sure enjoyed it.

True Detective took a weird turn for it’s second season.

Apr 1 '14
Mar 26 '14
newsweek:

Think managing your finances has to be complicated? Wonkblog contributor (and UC Chicago social scientist) Harold Pollack doesn’t.
After a talk with personal finance expert Helaine Olen, Pollack managed to write down pretty much everything you need to know on a 4x6 index card. And it would probably fit on a 3x5 index card if you really crammed (that last point, for instance, is probably not strictly necessary for managing your money).
He explains: The card came out of an RBC chat I had with Helaine Olen regarding what I view as the financial industry’s basic dilemma: The best investment advice fits on an index card. A commenter, Alex M, asked for the actual index card. Although I was originally speaking in metaphor, I grabbed a pen and one of my daughter’s note cards, scribbled this out in maybe three minutes, snapped a picture with my iPhone, and the rest was history.
Pollack’s right. Follow these principles and you’ll be in much, much, much better shape than most Americans — or most anyone. And all it will cost you is $2.20 for a pack of index cards — and you’ll have 99 of them left over.
It’s really hard to be poor (see Pollack’s amazing interview on how being poor changes the way people think for more on that). But the lesson here is that once you have an income that you can live off of and save a little bit besides, managing your finances shouldn’t be all that hard.
The people making it complicated are often trying to make money off of you. This 4×6 index card has all the financial advice you’ll ever need

newsweek:

Think managing your finances has to be complicated? Wonkblog contributor (and UC Chicago social scientist) Harold Pollack doesn’t.

After a talk with personal finance expert Helaine Olen, Pollack managed to write down pretty much everything you need to know on a 4x6 index card. And it would probably fit on a 3x5 index card if you really crammed (that last point, for instance, is probably not strictly necessary for managing your money).

He explains:
The card came out of an RBC chat I had with Helaine Olen regarding what I view as the financial industry’s basic dilemma: The best investment advice fits on an index card. A commenter, Alex M, asked for the actual index card. Although I was originally speaking in metaphor, I grabbed a pen and one of my daughter’s note cards, scribbled this out in maybe three minutes, snapped a picture with my iPhone, and the rest was history.

Pollack’s right. Follow these principles and you’ll be in much, much, much better shape than most Americans — or most anyone. And all it will cost you is $2.20 for a pack of index cards — and you’ll have 99 of them left over.

It’s really hard to be poor (see Pollack’s amazing interview on how being poor changes the way people think for more on that). But the lesson here is that once you have an income that you can live off of and save a little bit besides, managing your finances shouldn’t be all that hard.

The people making it complicated are often trying to make money off of you. This 4×6 index card has all the financial advice you’ll ever need

Mar 21 '14

(Source: vickibushell)

Feb 28 '14
hannibalhannibal:

Ya’ll gotta get it together.

I like how Hippies are fine and Capitalists are cool, but if ever the two should meet then it’s straight to Hell. Also, I’m surprised got so far with all those big fancy words and right at the bottom they misspell Shack. And how they only have a problem with that one Jehovah’s Witness and not all of them like the do with the other groups.I’m starting to think these aren’t the best people that made this sign. 

hannibalhannibal:

Ya’ll gotta get it together.

I like how Hippies are fine and Capitalists are cool, but if ever the two should meet then it’s straight to Hell. Also, I’m surprised got so far with all those big fancy words and right at the bottom they misspell Shack. And how they only have a problem with that one Jehovah’s Witness and not all of them like the do with the other groups.

I’m starting to think these aren’t the best people that made this sign. 

Feb 26 '14

I’ve been playing the new Strider recently. It’s a Metroidvania styled game that has the player exploring a large map and finding items that help him or her access different parts said map. It’s one of the only styles of games that places the player alone in a giant labyrinth and forces him or her to find their way out. It’s a great way to make a game halfway between linear and non-linear. Another game sub-genre that uses a labyrinthine setting survival horror. Both are generally listed as action or adventure or action-adventure by publishers and retailers as both are quite similar. Both Metroidvania and survival horror require exploration of large maps and some light combat and item acquisition. The biggest difference between the two is a not a gameplay mechanic as much as a narrative mechanic, character development. 

In Metroid, (A Metroidvania game), Samus, (The player character), is a bounty hunter that has to find her way alone through a maze of caves filled monsters. In the beginning, Samus can only jump and shoot. Throughout the game she finds items that award her new skills and weapons. By the end of the game, Samus has so many lasers and bombs and missiles and armor that even Tony Stark is jealous. The player character becomes an unstoppable powerhouse wrecking chumps left and right. This makes player feel powerful and the all the exploration makes the player feel like they earned that power. It makes the player feel like a hero, because its basically a variation of the hero’s journey.

Resident Evil was the first game to called a survival horror game. In Resident Evil the player controls Jill, (Or Chris, but let’s talk about Jill). Jill is a cop that has to find her way alone through a labyrinthine mansion while fighting of zombies and other monsters. The contrast is that Jill never gets stronger. Jill starts out as a cop with a gun and ends as a cop with a gun. While the monsters Jill fights get stronger, Jill stays the same. She doesn’t become a sci-fi super hero, she stays cop. Jill is a normal person thrown into in a crazy world. This makes the player feel weak compared the game’s enemy characters. The player feels like he or she can barely survive. 

That’s the big difference between the two. Samus makes you feel like you can take on the world and Jill makes feel like you need to run from it. One builds you up while the other knocks you down. This one difference drastically changes the experience of the game. Even with so many similarities people don’t compare Symphony of the Night to Silent Hill or Fatal Frame to Strider because the games feel so different. That one thing makes all the difference.

That and platforming. Strider gots to have sweet flips.

Feb 14 '14

Valentine’s Day Television

Although I do enjoy the Galentines episodes of Parks and Rec, my favorite Valentine’s Day episode is The Simpsons episode “I Love Lisa,” from season 4. Is it because it is about the social awkwardness of young people? Is it because the episode features Ralph Wiggum, the non sequitur machine? Is it because the plot focuses on unrequited love and I’m just bitter? No, no and no. It’s because of the Monster Mash. Even though the episode contains both Valentine’s Day and President’s Day, the episode begins with a radio in the background playing Monster Mash and ends with a radio in the background playing Monster Mash. It’s a reminder that, in TV sitcoms, everything ends just how they start. 

That and the mediocre presidents song. That’s pretty great too.

Feb 8 '14
thefrogman:

nbcnews:

Bobsledder Johnny Quinn Breaks Through Locked Door
(Photo: Johnny Quinn via Twitter)
Team USA bobsledder Johnny Quinn used his training unconventionally Saturday, after he got locked inside a bathroom at the Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia.
Continue reading

Johnny Quinn is secretly the Kool-aid Man. 

Oh Yeah!

thefrogman:

nbcnews:

Bobsledder Johnny Quinn Breaks Through Locked Door

(Photo: Johnny Quinn via Twitter)

Team USA bobsledder Johnny Quinn used his training unconventionally Saturday, after he got locked inside a bathroom at the Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia.

Continue reading

Johnny Quinn is secretly the Kool-aid Man. 

Oh Yeah!

(Source: NBCNews.com)

Feb 5 '14
Feb 3 '14

Super Bowl

This wasn’t my favorite Super Bowl to say the least. I watched the game with my brother as his favorite team got trounced and I saw one of my most disliked teams win the championship. 

For a long time, I didn’t care about the Seattle Seahawks one way or the other. I don’t care about most teams in the NFL. I have my team that I love and they have a couple of rivals, but Seattle isn’t one of those hated rivals. My dislike of the team began when they hired Pete Carroll. When he was the head coach of the University of Southern California the Trojans found remarkable success and he was heralded as one of the best NCAA coaches. When USC was found to be violating NCAA rules, the university’s football team faced harsh penalties. The team was not allowed to give as many scholarships to players and was banned from bowl games for a number of years. They were stripped of their 2004 BSC title and Reggie Bush, a former USC Trojan, gave back his Heisman Trophy, although voluntarily. 

Things were going to be pretty tough going forward for USC. Without scholarships they couldn’t recruit players that couldn’t afford tuition at a private school like USC. Being banned from bowl games meant that they couldn’t compete in the biggest NCAA games making it difficult to recruit star player intent on making a big splash in the league. USC was being shamed in the media and things were looking their darkest for Pete Carroll and his Trojans. There was going to be a tough road ahead. And that’s when he left.

Rather than help his Trojans recover, Pete Carroll left for Seattle to be an NFL head coach. When things got hard, he got going. While the students he recruited were banned from bowl games and the university was forced to offer fewer scholarships and a player voluntarily gave up the most prestigious award in college athletics, Pete Carroll was in the Emerald City making millions and coaching a team that was done rebuilding and ready for the big time. He got his and then he got out. Now he’s won a Super Bowl for the Seahawks and they can’t take that away from him. They only take titles away in college football.